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IRA Application - Traditional or Roth IRA (Contribution)
  • Open a Dodge & Cox Funds IRA and fund with a contribution. Please note, this type of account can be opened online.
IRA Application − Transfer of Assets , Rollover, or SEP IRA
  • Open a Dodge & Cox Funds IRA and request a transfer of assets from a non-Dodge & Cox Funds traditional or Roth IRA
  • Open a Dodge & Cox Funds IRA and request a rollover from your employer-sponsored retirement plan
  • Open a Dodge & Cox Funds SEP IRA
Notice to Investors Residing Outside the United States
Shares of the Dodge & Cox Funds are offered for sale only in the United States and are registered for sale in all states. While you may obtain prospectuses and other information about our Funds at this website, our Funds are not registered for sale in any other country. We will only mail prospectuses and other information to U.S. addresses, and we will only establish accounts with a U.S. address.
FAQS

Below are some commonly asked questions regarding IRAs.

IRA Basics
  • What is an IRA?

    An Individual Retirement Account (IRA) is a custodial account created to provide individuals a simple tax-advantaged way to accumulate funds for retirement. There are two basic types of IRAs — traditional and Roth.

  • What is the contribution limit?

    The maximum annual combined contribution you may make to traditional and Roth IRAs is $5,500 for 2013. The $5,500 limit is subject to annual increases for inflation in $500 increments. If you are age 50 or older during the year, the maximum annual combined contribution you may make to traditional and Roth IRAs is increased to $6,500 for 2013. Thereafter, the maximum contribution is $1,000 more than the maximum contribution for the year if you were under age 50.

  • What is the difference between a traditional IRA and a Roth IRA?

    With a traditional IRA, you may contribute up to the maximum contribution limit for the year, for each year until the year you reach age 70½, and you may be able to deduct the contribution from taxable income, thereby reducing your current income taxes. Taxes on investment earnings are deferred until the money is withdrawn. Withdrawals are taxed as additional ordinary income when received. Nondeductible contributions, if any, are withdrawn tax free. Withdrawals before age 59½ are assessed a 10% premature withdrawal penalty in addition to income tax, unless an exception applies. You are required to begin taking withdrawals from your traditional IRA after you reach age 70½.

    With a Roth IRA, the contribution limits are essentially the same as for a traditional IRA, but there isno tax deduction for contributions. All earnings in the account are tax free. Most importantly, you do not pay income taxes on qualified withdrawals from your Roth IRA, if certain requirements are met. Additionally, unlike a traditional IRA, there is no prohibition on making contributions to Roth IRAs after reaching age 70½, and there is no requirement that you begin making minimum withdrawals at that age.

  • Which is better, a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA?

    This depends upon your individual situation. A contribution to a traditional IRA may be tax deductible, while a contribution to a Roth IRA is not deductible. Also, the benefits of a traditional IRA versus Roth IRA may depend upon a number of other factors including: your current income tax bracket vs. your expected income tax bracket when you make withdrawals from your IRA, whether you expect to be able to make nontaxable withdrawals from your Roth IRA, how long you expect to leave your contributions in the IRA, and how much you expect the IRA to earn in the meantime.

    We suggest that you consult with a financial or tax advisor to determine whether you should establish a traditional or Roth IRA or convert any or all of an existing traditional IRA to a Roth IRA. Your tax advisor can also advise you as to the state tax consequences that may affect whether a traditional or Roth IRA is better for you.

Eligibility Requirements
  • What are the eligibility requirements for a traditional IRA?

    You are eligible to establish and contribute to a traditional IRA for a year if:

    • You received compensation (or earned income, if you are self-employed) during the year for personal services you rendered. If you received taxable alimony, this is treated like compensation for IRA purposes. Compensation does not include amounts received as a pension or annuity, amounts received as deferred compensation, amounts derived from or received as earnings or profits from property, such as interest, dividends and rent, or any amount not includable in gross income.
    • You did not reach age 70½ during the year.
  • What are the eligibility requirements for Roth IRA?

    You are eligible to establish and contribute to a Roth IRA for a given year if:

    • You received compensation (or earned income, if you are self-employed), subject to certain income limits, during the year for personal services you rendered. If you received taxable alimony, this is considered compensation for IRA purposes. Compensation does not include amounts received as a pension or annuity, amounts received as deferred compensation, amounts derived from or received as earnings or profits from property, such as interest, dividends and rent, or any amount not includable in gross income.
    • In contrast to a traditional IRA, you may continue making contributions to a Roth IRA after you reach age 70½.
Rules and Tax Matters
  • How are my IRA contributions invested?

    You control the investment and reinvestment of contributions to your Dodge & Cox Funds — State Street Bank and Trust Company IRA. Investments must be in one or more of the Dodge & Cox Funds. You direct the investment of your IRA by giving your investment instructions to the Transfer Agent for the Fund(s). Since you control the investment of your IRA, you are responsible for any losses; neither the Funds, the Custodian, nor the Transfer Agent has any responsibility for any loss or diminution in value occasioned by your exercise of investment control. Transactions for your IRA will generally be at the applicable net asset value per share for shares of the Fund(s) involved next established after the Transfer Agent receives proper investment instructions from you. You should consult the current prospectus for the Dodge & Cox Funds for additional information.

    Before making any investment, read carefully the current prospectus for any Fund you are considering as an investment for your traditional or Roth IRA. The prospectus will contain information about the Fund’s investment objectives and policies, as well as minimum initial investment requirements and any other charges.

    Because you control the selection of investments for your IRA and because mutual fund shares fluctuate in value, the growth in value of your IRA cannot be guaranteed or projected.

  • What IRA reports does the Custodian issue?

    The Custodian will report all withdrawals to the IRS and the recipient on the appropriate form. For reporting purposes, a direct transfer of assets to a successor custodian or trustee is not considered a withdrawal (except for a direct transfer that effects a conversion of a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, or a recharacterization of a Roth IRA back to a traditional IRA).

    The Custodian will report to the IRS the year-end value of your account and the amount of any rollover (including conversions from a traditional IRA to a Roth IRA) or regular contributions made during a calendar year, as well as the tax year for which a contribution is made.

    Unless the Custodian receives an indication from you to the contrary, it will treat an amount received as a contribution for the tax year in which it is received. It is important that a contribution made between January 1 and April 15 for the prior year be clearly designated as such.

  • Are the earnings on my traditional IRA taxed?

    Any earnings on the investments held in your traditional IRA are generally exempt from federal income taxes and will not be taxed until withdrawn by you, unless the tax-exempt status of your traditional IRA is revoked.

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Before investing in any Dodge & Cox Fund, you should carefully consider the Fund's investment objectives, risks, and management fees and other expenses. This and other important information is contained in a Fund's prospectus and summary prospectus. Please read the prospectus and summary prospectus carefully before investing. Investments are not FDIC-insured, nor are they deposits of or guaranteed by any bank or any other entity. Foreign investing, especially in developing countries, has special risks such as currency and market volatility and political and social instability.

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